Corrugate’s not just for boxes. This staple of the packaging world is capable of being used as furniture, household décor, museum-worthy artwork and more. With a little ingenuity and creative thinking, decorating with corrugate is a fun, cost-effective way to be artistic and original.

With Christmas fast approaching, holiday-lovers are prepping their decorations and displays—and the more hardcore decorators out there are looking for ways to be competitive and unique. Decorating with corrugate means your house, and even your yard, will stand out from the rest of the neighborhood. Here’s some great corrugated inspiration if you’re looking for a place to start.

Corrugated Christmas Trees

Decorating With Corrugate: Christmas Trees

Every year, the debate rages on: do you go with a real Christmas tree or a fake one? We say neither—go with corrugated! One of the best parts of starting with a box is you’re not limited to exactly what shape your new tree will take. You can simply stack boxes up into a tree shape, and maybe paint it green before you decorate it. Or you can take inspiration from the corrugated trees above and make trees that match a theme, or a design style. The corrugate’s the limit for this decorating experiment.

Wall Fireplace

Decorating With Corrugate: Fireplace

Who needs brick, when you’ve got boxes? All it takes is just a few and you’ve got yourself the makings of a lovely DIY corrugated wall fireplace. Wrap it in packing paper, grab some paints, and create the kind of fireplace you’d like—does it look stacked stone, marble, or brick? Speaking of, did you know you can buy paper rolls patterned with bricks? Talk about a timesaver.

Once you’re done, and your new fireplace has found its home against one of your walls, a tablet playing a video of a fire is (almost) all you’ll need to keep your room toasty warm!

Cardboard Taxidermy

Decorating With Corrugate: Wall Heads

If you’re in the mood for dressing up a den, but don’t have the hunting skills, cardboard taxidermy might be the thing for you. Once again, some corrugated boxes are all you’ll need to create some fun animal heads on the wall. If you’ve got the sense of humor we do, Frosty would look great up there, or like the picture suggests, even Rudolph. But, maybe don’t let Santa see that one, hmm?

Rolled Ornaments

Decorating With Corrugate: Rolled Ornaments

The feature that gives corrugated material its strength, also gives it one of its most visually-compelling features—we’re talking about its fluting. And one of the neatest things about single-face corrugate (that’s corrugate material with the fluting exposed on one side) is how well it translates into making textured corrugated ornaments. You can trace and cut out holiday shapes like gloves and snowflakes, stack cut pieces to create 3D shapes, and even simply roll it up to create the bodies of nearly any animal out there. Top it off with some twine to hang them on the tree, and who needs store-bought ornaments anymore, huh?

Corrugated Ornaments

Decorating With Corrugate: Corrugated Ornaments

Keeping with ornaments, good old reliable corrugate works just as well for them. There’s something warm and welcoming about homemade ornaments, cut by hand and decorated the way you want. Once they’re on the tree (or even on your front door’s wreath), you can grab a nice glass of eggnog and smile at a job well done.

Want to try making your own corrugated ornaments? We’ve created a bunch of holiday templates you can use to trace, cut and assemble your very own set. And, once you’ve finished decorating them, we’d love to see what you’ve done!

 

Get instant access to our FREE Christmas Printable Pack—and stay up-to-date on all the great content and products we have to offer!

 

If you’re eager to try your hand at decorating with corrugate, start with the basics: lots and lots of corrugates boxes. Do you have any great examples of Christmas décor made from corrugate? We’d love to see it, so be sure to tag us on social media—we might even try making it ourselves!

Image Sources: Pinterest, Carolyn’s Homework, Recylart.org